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New Zealand Police choose iPads and iPhones in $159m deal

o Karen Haslam
16.02.2013 kl 08:05 | Macworld U.K.

Apple and Vodafone have secured a deal with the New Zealand Police to provide 6,000 police officers with iPhones and 3,900 of those officers with iPads.

 

The iPhone is the smartphone of choice for New Zealand police.

Apple has secured a deal with the New Zealand Police to provide 6,000 police officers with iPhones and 3,900 of those officers with iPads. (in other news, The Australian Traffic Authority has retired 1,300 Sunflower iMacs after 10 years of service)

A report by The National Business Review outlines the details of the ten-year contract that could cost the New Zealand Police AU$159 million (£106 million). The police claim the investment will provide productivity benefits of AU$305 million (£203 million) over 10 years, however.

The New Zealand officers apparently preferred the Apple products to the Blackberry, Microsoft and Google options they were presented with.

NZ Police chief information officer Stephen Crombie told NBR: "Based on frontline officer feedback from the trial (over 100 staff in four districts trialed smartphones, laptops and tablets over an 11-month period) the preferred devices are the iPhone as smartphone and iPad for the tablet. The approach used to develop the applications means Police can move to other devices with relative ease as technology changes."

Vodafone won the deal to provide the contracts.

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Keywords: Hardware Systems  Consumer Electronics  
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