IDG News Service >
 

Sierra Leone Implements Exchange Point

o Olusegun Abolaji Ogundeji
01.07.2010 kl 17:11 | Computerworld West Africa

The launch of the Sierra Leone Internet Exchange (SLIX) has eliminated the need for the country's Internet communications to go through international gateways, allowing the country's ISPs to interconnect directly via the local exchange.

 

The launch of the Sierra Leone Internet Exchange (SLIX) has eliminated the need for the country's Internet communications to go through international gateways, allowing the country's ISPs to interconnect directly via the local exchange.

Sixteen years since Internet access was introduced to Sierra Leone, the country has become the 19th African nation to have an Internet exchange point. One of the objectives of SLIX is to help stimulate the entry of new markets that would promote the development of local content.

Preceding the launch, AfriNIC (African Network Information Center), the regional Internet registry, provided IPv6 training for network administrators and ISOC Internet Exchange training for CTOs.

AfriNIC's LIR (Local Internet Registry) training is aimed at helping the African Internet community understand how AfriNIC manages Internet numbers resources, how members can request Internet resources and how to use the AfriNIC database efficiently.

Speaking before the SLIX launch last week, AfriNIC Regional Development Manager for Africa, Michuki Mwangi, said Sierra Leone will benefit immensely from innovation as IPv4 has several disadvantages such as a limited 4.2 billion possible unique addresses and a very slow Internet connection.

With IPv4, he explained, e-mail has to go through the international gateway before being delivered to the recipient, no matter how close the person may be. But IPv6 has the capacity for a limitless number of addresses and it allows for Internet communication within the country to be managed by local operators. Keeping the local Internet traffic within the country will help reduce latency.

According to ISOC-SL (Intenet Society-Sierra Leone), the six ISPs in the country and other several institutions operate independent networks and each route their Internet traffic through international upstream providers, which does not encourage the development of local content but entrenches dependence on external technologies and content.

ISOC-SL in a report cited Kenya, where within two weeks of operating the Kenya Internet Exchange, latency was reduced from an average of 1200-2000 milliseconds (via satellite) to 60-80 milliseconds (via KIXP) and monthly bandwidth costs reduced from US$3,375 to $200 for 64k bps and from $9,546 to $650 for a 512K bps.

Keywords: Telecommunication  Internet  
Latest news from IDG News Service

Copyright 2009 IDG Magazines Norge AS. All rights reserved

Postboks 9090 Grønland - 0133 OSLO / Telefon 22053000

Ansvarlig redaktør Henning Meese / Utviklingsansvarlig Ulf Helland / Salgsdirektør Tore Harald Pettersen