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New Buying Pattern is Changing IAM: ILANTUS Technologies

o Radhika Nallayam
30.05.2014 kl 13:38 | Computerworld India

Binod Singh, President and CEO, ILANTUS Technologies, believes that as more business departments start making IT purchase decisions, it's changing the way identity and access management (IAM) is built and sold. IAM will have to move from its monolithic past to a dynamic, fragmented, and user-friendly avatar.

 

Binod Singh, President and CEO, ILANTUS Technologies, believes that as more business departments start making IT purchase decisions, it's changing the way identity and access management (IAM) is built and sold. IAM will have to move from its monolithic past to a dynamic, fragmented, and user-friendly avatar.

From a services company that catered mainly to the North American market, ILANTUS has started taking the India market quite seriously. You also shifted your focus to products from services. What is the reason?

When we started off, identity and access management (IAM) was a relatively new area in markets like India. We chose the US market, because it recognized the need for IAM better, due to its strict regulatory compliance requirements. By 2010, we were doing very well in the US. At the time, we were one of the top-five IAM solution companies in the US. In 2010-11, Gartner identified us as a cool vendor. It was a turning point for the company. Our discussion with Gartner shed some light on the future of this technology. We realized that factors like the cloud, BYOD, and social media would bring a dimension to IAM. Gartner also was of the opinion that it was the right time for us to build IP. Though we were a services company in the US, we had a productized approach to services there. We delivered high-value projects, and never focused on pure-vanilla services. The capabilities around providing specialized services helped us a lot when we wanted to shift to products. India was maturing as an IAM market. Besides, our team sits here. So it was the next logical move for us to launch our products in India.

How does your understanding of the US market help you here in India? Do you think that the IT leaders in the region think differently from their western counterparts?

Indian CIOs are some of the most intelligent and tech-savvy lot in the world. In the US, a CIO does not know much about technology; he is more of an administrator. CIOs in India understand technology and are willing to place more bets with new technologies. In that sense, India is an interesting market. India is jumping a lot of technology levels. Gone are the days when trends surfaced later among Indian enterprises, than in the US. BYOD, for instance, is a reality in both markets. Cloud computing, perhaps, is one area India is lagging behind a bit, but, again, by not very much. The other big change is that IT purchase decisions are driven by business departments. In the US, the trend is sweeping across the country. Businesses demands there are more urgent; businesses say they need things today! They work in a very competitive environment and need solutions that requires IT support of a different kind. They don't have the time for IT to assess, buy, and deploy solutions--a process that can take many months. So they are bypassing IT. At one point, CIOs in the US were not very happy with that, but they eventually fell in line. I see the same thing happening in India.

Does this trend influence the way in which organizations approach IAM?

Most certainly. In fact, this trend is what's driving changes in IAM: It's no longer a big monolithic piece of software any more. It has been broken up into different pieces, which can be consumed by different businesses. Marketing, for example, needs identity federation solutions, in order to collaborate with outside companies to provide services. The point is: there are different IAM buyers within an enterprise. The traditional buyers are CISOs and CIOs. Now we are talking more to the businesses. In markets like the US, we are talking a lot more to marketing directors, production VPs, and the likes. Most of these business buyers don't even talk technology. As a result, we have to build our products in bits and pieces, and still make it possible to integrate them if needed. Big monolithic IAM software, which delivered multiple functionalities, is a thing of the past. Apart from that, customers are now looking for industry-specific solutions.

How do businesses evaluate IAM, if they don't talk technology?

User experience is one of the major issues. As I said, businesses are now making IT decisions. Yet, they don't understand technology. They look for something that can be got up-and-running in no time. And they want to be able to activate it themselves. User experience is very important. Customers appreciate it a lot when we give them a product that is easy to use and manage. User experience will play a very major role in decision-making in the coming years.

Keywords: IT Management  
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